Presentation Title

Comparing Conventional and Alternative Control of Linaria genistifolia ssp. dalmatica In a Semi-Arid Grassland of British Columbia's Southern Interior

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

Dalmatian toadflax is a major concern in disturbed areas of British Columbia’s interior due to its ability to displace native vegetation. To investigate the most appropriate control method, including efficiency and scalability, a study was established in Kenna Cartwright Nature Park, Kamloops, BC in 2016. The study compared manual removal and three herbicide treatments (broadcast, spot spraying and wicking) by collecting live and dead stem count in 6m by 6m replicates (n=30). Tordon 22K was applied (213 g ae ha-1 picloram) mixed with Agral 90 surfactant (0.025% by volume). Treatment had a significant effect; broadcast and spot spraying provided the highest overall success resulting in mean stem counts of 1.7±1.07 and 6.33±2.67, respectively. These were also the only treatments to eliminate nearly all vegetative regrowth at the end of the growing season.. Wicking offered the same overall success as spot spraying in reducing total live stems and may provide an option on low density sites. Although manual removal eliminated all plants at time of treatment, there was high regrowth which resulted in statistical similarity to the control. Only broadcast and spot spraying provide statistically significant reduction in vegetative stems from pre-treatment to end-of-season. For medium-high density sites (mean stem count 25.91m-2), broadcast and spot spraying offer the greatest chance of success based on both success and efficiency. This research highlights the importance of planning invasive plant management on small scales and provides land managers with multiple integrated management components to consider when removing Dalmatian toadflax from semi-arid grasslands.

Department

Natural Resource Science

Faculty Advisor

Wendy Gardner

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Comparing Conventional and Alternative Control of Linaria genistifolia ssp. dalmatica In a Semi-Arid Grassland of British Columbia's Southern Interior

Dalmatian toadflax is a major concern in disturbed areas of British Columbia’s interior due to its ability to displace native vegetation. To investigate the most appropriate control method, including efficiency and scalability, a study was established in Kenna Cartwright Nature Park, Kamloops, BC in 2016. The study compared manual removal and three herbicide treatments (broadcast, spot spraying and wicking) by collecting live and dead stem count in 6m by 6m replicates (n=30). Tordon 22K was applied (213 g ae ha-1 picloram) mixed with Agral 90 surfactant (0.025% by volume). Treatment had a significant effect; broadcast and spot spraying provided the highest overall success resulting in mean stem counts of 1.7±1.07 and 6.33±2.67, respectively. These were also the only treatments to eliminate nearly all vegetative regrowth at the end of the growing season.. Wicking offered the same overall success as spot spraying in reducing total live stems and may provide an option on low density sites. Although manual removal eliminated all plants at time of treatment, there was high regrowth which resulted in statistical similarity to the control. Only broadcast and spot spraying provide statistically significant reduction in vegetative stems from pre-treatment to end-of-season. For medium-high density sites (mean stem count 25.91m-2), broadcast and spot spraying offer the greatest chance of success based on both success and efficiency. This research highlights the importance of planning invasive plant management on small scales and provides land managers with multiple integrated management components to consider when removing Dalmatian toadflax from semi-arid grasslands.