Presentation Title

Environmental Sustainability: Urban Agriculture in Japan’s Major Metropolitan Areas

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

Urban agriculture is common throughout the world. It has helped nations maintain a level of environmental sustainability in their cities by growing local foods, and this practice has helped to increase food consumption. In the suburban areas of Tokyo, we looked at the scattering of urban agriculture, and how it has become a sustainable resource for the residents. We looked at the pros, e.g., fresh food and the provision of green space; the cons, e.g., the use of pesticides and other harmful chemicals; the regulations related to urban farming; and the rural idyll, a way to view sustainable urban agriculture as a form of back-to-the-land movement. We undertook a critical literature review of research articles and abstracts to understand the environmental sustainability of urban agriculture in Tokyo. The results revealed that urban agriculture in Tokyo’s suburbs was already a very popular activity for residents from a health perspective. It provides a sustainable activity – gardening -- that has health benefits while keeping their gardens pesticide free. Moreover, several planning acts have permitted the building of suburban community gardens. The principal conclusion is that urban agriculture is a sustainable environmental resource for the residents of Tokyo’s suburbs.

Department

Geography and Environmental Studies

Faculty Advisor

Tom Waldichuk

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Environmental Sustainability: Urban Agriculture in Japan’s Major Metropolitan Areas

Urban agriculture is common throughout the world. It has helped nations maintain a level of environmental sustainability in their cities by growing local foods, and this practice has helped to increase food consumption. In the suburban areas of Tokyo, we looked at the scattering of urban agriculture, and how it has become a sustainable resource for the residents. We looked at the pros, e.g., fresh food and the provision of green space; the cons, e.g., the use of pesticides and other harmful chemicals; the regulations related to urban farming; and the rural idyll, a way to view sustainable urban agriculture as a form of back-to-the-land movement. We undertook a critical literature review of research articles and abstracts to understand the environmental sustainability of urban agriculture in Tokyo. The results revealed that urban agriculture in Tokyo’s suburbs was already a very popular activity for residents from a health perspective. It provides a sustainable activity – gardening -- that has health benefits while keeping their gardens pesticide free. Moreover, several planning acts have permitted the building of suburban community gardens. The principal conclusion is that urban agriculture is a sustainable environmental resource for the residents of Tokyo’s suburbs.