Presentation Title

Development of an Analytical Method for the Identification and Quantification of Xanthate Compounds in Mining Water by Capillary Electrophoresis

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

Xanthates; a family of chemical compounds used to aid froth flotation in the mining industry, are used every day by mining companies across the globe. Potassium amyl xanthate (PAX) is the most commonly used floatation agent, but the market for xanthates only requires retailers to indicate the percentage of their product that contains active xanthates. This gives rise to a large variation in PAX composition, and inconsistencies in the amount needed per volume of water. Since there are eight different xanthate compounds found in industry, all of which have different masses, it is important to know the exact make-up of each bag of PAX. Using capillary electrophoresis (CE) a method was developed for separating and quantifying each of the available xanthate compounds. This was achieved by using industry standards of all available compounds, testing variations on a method, and adjusting said method until it was satisfactory for each xanthate. Method optimization involved buffer, voltage, pH, and detector modification. Once a homogenous method was developed, mixtures of the compounds were prepared and analyzed to validate the process. All available xanthate standards were quantitatively separated and positively identified in various concentration mixtures.

Department

Chemistry

Faculty Advisor

Kingsley Donkor

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Development of an Analytical Method for the Identification and Quantification of Xanthate Compounds in Mining Water by Capillary Electrophoresis

Xanthates; a family of chemical compounds used to aid froth flotation in the mining industry, are used every day by mining companies across the globe. Potassium amyl xanthate (PAX) is the most commonly used floatation agent, but the market for xanthates only requires retailers to indicate the percentage of their product that contains active xanthates. This gives rise to a large variation in PAX composition, and inconsistencies in the amount needed per volume of water. Since there are eight different xanthate compounds found in industry, all of which have different masses, it is important to know the exact make-up of each bag of PAX. Using capillary electrophoresis (CE) a method was developed for separating and quantifying each of the available xanthate compounds. This was achieved by using industry standards of all available compounds, testing variations on a method, and adjusting said method until it was satisfactory for each xanthate. Method optimization involved buffer, voltage, pH, and detector modification. Once a homogenous method was developed, mixtures of the compounds were prepared and analyzed to validate the process. All available xanthate standards were quantitatively separated and positively identified in various concentration mixtures.