Presentation Title

The Impact of the Terrestrial Basking Event of Hawaiian Green Sea Turtles on Visitors at Ho'okipa, Maui: Creating More Responsible Tourists?

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

The U.S. is the second most visited country in the world. Beaches are the top destination choice of visitors, and Maui has been voted the best island in the U.S. for the 23rd year. Coastal and marine tourism produces 85% of U.S. tourist revenue. “Marine Tourism includes those recreational activities that involve travel away from one’s place of residence and which have as their host or focus the marine environment”.

Maui’s marine tourism includes green sea turtles that emerge from the ocean to bask on the sand, at Ho’okipa Beach Park. The event draws 500 visitors per day. On the beach, a local non-profit, Hawai’i Wildlife Fund, uses interpretation as a visitor management strategy to protect the turtles listed as ‘threatened’ under the Endangered Species Act.

The goal of this research is to examine the impact of the terrestrial basking event of Hawaiian green sea turtles on visitors at Ho’okipa, Maui. The objective is to identify if visitors transition into more responsible marine tourists adapting Oram’s model of marine-tourist interaction.

The case study approach will involve a random intercept survey of approximately 400 visitors over 8 weeks during the summer of 2017. The survey will gather qualitative and quantitative data and profile visitor satisfaction, learning, attitudes, and behavior changes. Data will be analyzed using Excel and SPSS. The results will be presented to Hawai’i Wildlife Fund, submitted to the TRU Undergraduate Research Conference and Journal, and presented at the International Competence Network for Tourism Research and Education in Auckland New Zealand, 2017.

Department

Tourism Management

Faculty Advisor

John Hull

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The Impact of the Terrestrial Basking Event of Hawaiian Green Sea Turtles on Visitors at Ho'okipa, Maui: Creating More Responsible Tourists?

The U.S. is the second most visited country in the world. Beaches are the top destination choice of visitors, and Maui has been voted the best island in the U.S. for the 23rd year. Coastal and marine tourism produces 85% of U.S. tourist revenue. “Marine Tourism includes those recreational activities that involve travel away from one’s place of residence and which have as their host or focus the marine environment”.

Maui’s marine tourism includes green sea turtles that emerge from the ocean to bask on the sand, at Ho’okipa Beach Park. The event draws 500 visitors per day. On the beach, a local non-profit, Hawai’i Wildlife Fund, uses interpretation as a visitor management strategy to protect the turtles listed as ‘threatened’ under the Endangered Species Act.

The goal of this research is to examine the impact of the terrestrial basking event of Hawaiian green sea turtles on visitors at Ho’okipa, Maui. The objective is to identify if visitors transition into more responsible marine tourists adapting Oram’s model of marine-tourist interaction.

The case study approach will involve a random intercept survey of approximately 400 visitors over 8 weeks during the summer of 2017. The survey will gather qualitative and quantitative data and profile visitor satisfaction, learning, attitudes, and behavior changes. Data will be analyzed using Excel and SPSS. The results will be presented to Hawai’i Wildlife Fund, submitted to the TRU Undergraduate Research Conference and Journal, and presented at the International Competence Network for Tourism Research and Education in Auckland New Zealand, 2017.