Presentation Title

Connecting the Dots: The Metabolomic Profile of Grindelia squarrosa

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

The discovery of new compounds that have biological activity is an important focus of natural product chemists, particularly as the field of personalized medicine develops. Unfortunately, methods that require identifying biological activity in a complex crude mixture and “chasing” that activity through purification steps result in a highly biased selection of compounds, relying on strong activity and high concentrations in the original sample. A method that is gaining popularity is metabolomics, where a chemical profile detailing all the constituents of an extract is determined, then separation and high throughput screening done to determine bioactive constituents. This approach allows activities that rely on multiple compounds to be detected, as well as the ability to identify and ignore any activity from previously discovered compounds. I will discuss using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics to identify the constituents in an extract of Grindelia squarrosa, a plant traditionally used as a medicinal agent.

Department

Chemistry

Faculty Advisor

Bruno Cinel

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Connecting the Dots: The Metabolomic Profile of Grindelia squarrosa

The discovery of new compounds that have biological activity is an important focus of natural product chemists, particularly as the field of personalized medicine develops. Unfortunately, methods that require identifying biological activity in a complex crude mixture and “chasing” that activity through purification steps result in a highly biased selection of compounds, relying on strong activity and high concentrations in the original sample. A method that is gaining popularity is metabolomics, where a chemical profile detailing all the constituents of an extract is determined, then separation and high throughput screening done to determine bioactive constituents. This approach allows activities that rely on multiple compounds to be detected, as well as the ability to identify and ignore any activity from previously discovered compounds. I will discuss using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics to identify the constituents in an extract of Grindelia squarrosa, a plant traditionally used as a medicinal agent.