Presentation Title

The Function of Exercise-Derived Microvesicles

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

Microvesicles (MV) were once thought to be inert cellular fragments; however, a large body of research suggests they are bioactive components involved in intercellular communication and altering physiological processes. As these 100 nm – 1 µm plasma-membrane derived vesicles are formed from many cell types, they vary significantly in composition and function. Recently, it has been shown that high intensity exercise increases the concentration of circulating platelet-derived MVs. While the role of these MVs is unknown, they have been shown to improve the functionality of endothelial cells, indicating a potential for mediating the adaptive effect of exercise on the cardiovascular system. The present study aims to further examine the effect of these exercise-derived MVs on the endothelium as well as investigate the mechanism through which MVs and endothelial cells interact. Exercise trials were performed to produce MV samples from eleven participants. To test the effect of MVs, endothelial cells were treated with the samples. Their functionality, in terms of proliferation and wound-healing, was examined. In combination with these functional studies, several cellular components that potentially mediate the MV-endothelial interaction were pharmacologically blocked to gain insight into their mechanism of interaction. The results of this study provide baseline data about the function of MVs in young, healthy individuals, leading towards future studies focused on MV-induced adaptations in elderly or inactive individuals.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Mark Rakobowchuk

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The Function of Exercise-Derived Microvesicles

Microvesicles (MV) were once thought to be inert cellular fragments; however, a large body of research suggests they are bioactive components involved in intercellular communication and altering physiological processes. As these 100 nm – 1 µm plasma-membrane derived vesicles are formed from many cell types, they vary significantly in composition and function. Recently, it has been shown that high intensity exercise increases the concentration of circulating platelet-derived MVs. While the role of these MVs is unknown, they have been shown to improve the functionality of endothelial cells, indicating a potential for mediating the adaptive effect of exercise on the cardiovascular system. The present study aims to further examine the effect of these exercise-derived MVs on the endothelium as well as investigate the mechanism through which MVs and endothelial cells interact. Exercise trials were performed to produce MV samples from eleven participants. To test the effect of MVs, endothelial cells were treated with the samples. Their functionality, in terms of proliferation and wound-healing, was examined. In combination with these functional studies, several cellular components that potentially mediate the MV-endothelial interaction were pharmacologically blocked to gain insight into their mechanism of interaction. The results of this study provide baseline data about the function of MVs in young, healthy individuals, leading towards future studies focused on MV-induced adaptations in elderly or inactive individuals.