Presentation Title

Screening for Mutagenic and Anti-mutagenic Properties of Cave Microorganisms

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

Caves are extreme, isolated environments that house diverse microbiomes. Current research in the field of cave microbiology has resulted in the discovery of several microorganisms which possess antimicrobial properties and display potential for novel antibiotic drug production. In the early stages of the drug development process, preliminary screening of the compound is necessary to examine the spectrum of activity, in terms of suitability for therapeutic use.

The Ames Salmonella/Microsome Mutagenicity assay is a preliminary test that is often used to screen compounds for mutagenic, as well as anti-mutagenic, properties. As such, the optimization of the Ames assay is a necessary step for the development of antimicrobial compounds into potential antibiotics. Optimization of the Ames protocol was performed to prepare the assay for use with an S9 microsomal fraction, which is involved in metabolic activation, and allow for accurate recognition of mutagenic/anti-mutagenic properties. Salmonella typhimurium strains, TA 98 and TA100, have been tested against known mutagens, 4-nitro--phenylenediamine and sodium azide respectively, in semi-solid top agar on minimal glucose agar plates. All control tests were incubated aerobically at 37oC for 12-16 hours. In this study, approximately one hundred cave microorganisms possessing antimicrobial activity, which were previously isolated by the Cheeptham laboratory at Thompson Rivers University, will be screened for mutagenicity by way of the Ames assay. Results of this study will allow for the profiling of cave microorganisms, as well as for better understanding of the antimicrobial capabilities of these organisms.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Naowarat Cheeptham

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Screening for Mutagenic and Anti-mutagenic Properties of Cave Microorganisms

Caves are extreme, isolated environments that house diverse microbiomes. Current research in the field of cave microbiology has resulted in the discovery of several microorganisms which possess antimicrobial properties and display potential for novel antibiotic drug production. In the early stages of the drug development process, preliminary screening of the compound is necessary to examine the spectrum of activity, in terms of suitability for therapeutic use.

The Ames Salmonella/Microsome Mutagenicity assay is a preliminary test that is often used to screen compounds for mutagenic, as well as anti-mutagenic, properties. As such, the optimization of the Ames assay is a necessary step for the development of antimicrobial compounds into potential antibiotics. Optimization of the Ames protocol was performed to prepare the assay for use with an S9 microsomal fraction, which is involved in metabolic activation, and allow for accurate recognition of mutagenic/anti-mutagenic properties. Salmonella typhimurium strains, TA 98 and TA100, have been tested against known mutagens, 4-nitro--phenylenediamine and sodium azide respectively, in semi-solid top agar on minimal glucose agar plates. All control tests were incubated aerobically at 37oC for 12-16 hours. In this study, approximately one hundred cave microorganisms possessing antimicrobial activity, which were previously isolated by the Cheeptham laboratory at Thompson Rivers University, will be screened for mutagenicity by way of the Ames assay. Results of this study will allow for the profiling of cave microorganisms, as well as for better understanding of the antimicrobial capabilities of these organisms.