Presentation Title

Humans and the Natural World in Canadian Literature

Location

3rd floor House of Learning

Start Date

31-3-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

31-3-2017 4:00 PM

Abstract

A presentation by the students of English 4260: Back to Nature: The Environment in Canadian Literature

In this session, students will showcase their final assignments for English 4260. Students are presenting their responses to several works on their syllabus, analyzing, specifically, the relationship between humans and the natural world. Cheryll Glotfelty’s introduction to The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology provided the starting point: “Simply put, ecocriticism is the study of the relationship between literature and the physical environment….As a physical stance, it has one foot in literature and the other on the land; as a theoretical discourse, it negotiates between the human and the non-human” (xviii-xix). In 2017, what could be more relevant than an investigation into this complex and delicate relationship? We see our showcase as a forum for sharing our insights and promoting respectful conversation with the TRU community.

Ginny Ratsoy would like to acknowledge the input of Elizabeth Rennie, Miranda Marini and Elizabeth Funk into this assignment. Special thanks are due to Lisa Cooke and her Anthropology 4050 students for inspiring the assignment and leading the way.

English 4260 students acknowledge Service Learning 3000 student Elizabeth Funk for her assistance in coordinating this project.

Department

English and Modern Languages

Faculty Advisor

Ginny Ratsoy

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Mar 31st, 2:00 PM Mar 31st, 4:00 PM

Humans and the Natural World in Canadian Literature

3rd floor House of Learning

A presentation by the students of English 4260: Back to Nature: The Environment in Canadian Literature

In this session, students will showcase their final assignments for English 4260. Students are presenting their responses to several works on their syllabus, analyzing, specifically, the relationship between humans and the natural world. Cheryll Glotfelty’s introduction to The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks in Literary Ecology provided the starting point: “Simply put, ecocriticism is the study of the relationship between literature and the physical environment….As a physical stance, it has one foot in literature and the other on the land; as a theoretical discourse, it negotiates between the human and the non-human” (xviii-xix). In 2017, what could be more relevant than an investigation into this complex and delicate relationship? We see our showcase as a forum for sharing our insights and promoting respectful conversation with the TRU community.

Ginny Ratsoy would like to acknowledge the input of Elizabeth Rennie, Miranda Marini and Elizabeth Funk into this assignment. Special thanks are due to Lisa Cooke and her Anthropology 4050 students for inspiring the assignment and leading the way.

English 4260 students acknowledge Service Learning 3000 student Elizabeth Funk for her assistance in coordinating this project.