Presentation Title

Determination of Ombrotrophy in the Blaauw Eco Forest Through Core Sampling, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Groundwater Level Monitoring and Peatland Species Mapping

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

Determining whether a wetland is ombrotrophic or minerotrophic is foundational for further studies of that area. Wetlands with fibrous material in the soil known as peat are called as peatlands. Most peatlands can be categorized along a minerotrophic (nutrient rich) to ombrotrophic (nutrient poor) spectrum depending on hydrology, vegetation and nutrient content. In a study in 2012 a wetland was discovered in the northeastern corner of the Blaauw Eco Forest in Glen Valley just east of Fort Langley, B.C. and subsequent research in 2014 revealed it was a peatland. The center of the peatland was determined using elevation readings from Air Borne GPS and HP data from a mapping study in 2008 and the border was determined with readings from GPS handheld equipment and GIS software from 2016. In order to determine whether this specific peatland is ombrotrophic or minerotrophic, flame atomic absorbance spectroscopy will be used to analyze calcium and magnesium concentrations in core samples taken along a transect within the bog. Vegetation composition will also be assessed to further support the peatland type. Results are expected to indicate the property is ombrotrophic since there are many of these types of bogs near the Fraser River. If the area is indeed ombrotrophic, the unique properties of these bogs open opportunities for students to investigate paleological studies of pollen, vegetation fossils, carbon dating, amoebas and unique peatland ecosystems.

Department

Environmental Science

Faculty Advisor

David Clements

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Determination of Ombrotrophy in the Blaauw Eco Forest Through Core Sampling, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Groundwater Level Monitoring and Peatland Species Mapping

Determining whether a wetland is ombrotrophic or minerotrophic is foundational for further studies of that area. Wetlands with fibrous material in the soil known as peat are called as peatlands. Most peatlands can be categorized along a minerotrophic (nutrient rich) to ombrotrophic (nutrient poor) spectrum depending on hydrology, vegetation and nutrient content. In a study in 2012 a wetland was discovered in the northeastern corner of the Blaauw Eco Forest in Glen Valley just east of Fort Langley, B.C. and subsequent research in 2014 revealed it was a peatland. The center of the peatland was determined using elevation readings from Air Borne GPS and HP data from a mapping study in 2008 and the border was determined with readings from GPS handheld equipment and GIS software from 2016. In order to determine whether this specific peatland is ombrotrophic or minerotrophic, flame atomic absorbance spectroscopy will be used to analyze calcium and magnesium concentrations in core samples taken along a transect within the bog. Vegetation composition will also be assessed to further support the peatland type. Results are expected to indicate the property is ombrotrophic since there are many of these types of bogs near the Fraser River. If the area is indeed ombrotrophic, the unique properties of these bogs open opportunities for students to investigate paleological studies of pollen, vegetation fossils, carbon dating, amoebas and unique peatland ecosystems.