Presentation Title

Effects of Mindfulness Training on Implicit Beliefs and Well-being in Undergraduate Students

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

Experimental research has suggested that holding incremental beliefs about emotions, (in other words, believing that emotions are malleable rather than fixed) enhances well-being by facilitating adaptive emotion regulation. Within the present study, we are assessing the impact of the Smiling Mind mindfulness program on students’ implicit beliefs about the malleability of their intelligence, personality, and emotions. Introductory psychology student participants are undergoing a 10-minute intervention from the same counselor once a week for five weeks. One class is experiencing the Smiling Mind intervention. A second class serves as a control group, receiving educational information on various wellness topics and mental training. A third class is receiving no intervention. All participants complete pre- and post-measures assessing flourishing, implicit beliefs, mindfulness, and stress. We expect that participants in the Smiling Mind program will show a shift towards more incremental beliefs about intelligence, personality, and emotions, from pre- to post-intervention, compared to those in the control groups. Additionally, we expect that these changes in beliefs will predict academic achievement, flourishing, and stress.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Catherine Ortner

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Effects of Mindfulness Training on Implicit Beliefs and Well-being in Undergraduate Students

Experimental research has suggested that holding incremental beliefs about emotions, (in other words, believing that emotions are malleable rather than fixed) enhances well-being by facilitating adaptive emotion regulation. Within the present study, we are assessing the impact of the Smiling Mind mindfulness program on students’ implicit beliefs about the malleability of their intelligence, personality, and emotions. Introductory psychology student participants are undergoing a 10-minute intervention from the same counselor once a week for five weeks. One class is experiencing the Smiling Mind intervention. A second class serves as a control group, receiving educational information on various wellness topics and mental training. A third class is receiving no intervention. All participants complete pre- and post-measures assessing flourishing, implicit beliefs, mindfulness, and stress. We expect that participants in the Smiling Mind program will show a shift towards more incremental beliefs about intelligence, personality, and emotions, from pre- to post-intervention, compared to those in the control groups. Additionally, we expect that these changes in beliefs will predict academic achievement, flourishing, and stress.