Presentation Title

Screening of Cave Microorganisms Isolated From White Rabbit Cave and a Newly Discovered Cave “Over The Hill” for Antimicrobial Activity

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

The antibiotic resistance mechanisms in microorganisms has rapidly evolved over the past decades due to the overuse and misuse of antibiotics. As the efficiency of commercially available antibiotics decreases, the secondary metabolites produced by the cave bacteria could be the new possible source of novel antibiotic development. Due to the limitation of nutrients in cave environment, microorganisms may produce specific secondary metabolite(s) to be able to thrive in such extreme habitat. Hence, using cave microorganisms as the untapped source for antimicrobial agent producers could lead us to discover interesting bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to focus on screening for the antimicrobial activity of the cave microorganisms against nine bacterial and fungal strains. These include include E. coli (non-resistant and three MDR multi-drug resistant strains), S. aureus (non-resistant and Methicillin resistant (MRSA)), C. albicans, P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens. Screening of antimicrobial activity was performed using plug agar assay and pour plate technique with target microorganism inoculum. Seven types of culture media were used to isolate cave bacteria and fungi from the cave sediment samples (SDA, R2A, WL, SDA+ Chloramphenicol+

biphenyl, SDA+ Delvocid+ Chloramphenicol, R2A+ Biphenyl+ Delvocid, WL+

Chloramphenicol+ Biphenyl, WL+ Delvocid+ Chloramphenicol) and the isolates were incubated at 15°C for 4-6 weeks. Ninety-six of microorganisms were isolated from the sediment sample of the “White Rabbit Cave” and a newly discovered cave, “Over The Hill”. Nutrient agar (NA) and potato dextrose agar (PDA) were used for the bioassay plates, and it was incubated at 15°C for 5-7 days until the cave isolates were grown. One positive candidate was found to inhibit the S. aureus (non-pathogenic strain) and the identification of the microorganisms will be done by DNA sequencing in the future study.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Naowarat Cheeptham

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Screening of Cave Microorganisms Isolated From White Rabbit Cave and a Newly Discovered Cave “Over The Hill” for Antimicrobial Activity

The antibiotic resistance mechanisms in microorganisms has rapidly evolved over the past decades due to the overuse and misuse of antibiotics. As the efficiency of commercially available antibiotics decreases, the secondary metabolites produced by the cave bacteria could be the new possible source of novel antibiotic development. Due to the limitation of nutrients in cave environment, microorganisms may produce specific secondary metabolite(s) to be able to thrive in such extreme habitat. Hence, using cave microorganisms as the untapped source for antimicrobial agent producers could lead us to discover interesting bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to focus on screening for the antimicrobial activity of the cave microorganisms against nine bacterial and fungal strains. These include include E. coli (non-resistant and three MDR multi-drug resistant strains), S. aureus (non-resistant and Methicillin resistant (MRSA)), C. albicans, P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens. Screening of antimicrobial activity was performed using plug agar assay and pour plate technique with target microorganism inoculum. Seven types of culture media were used to isolate cave bacteria and fungi from the cave sediment samples (SDA, R2A, WL, SDA+ Chloramphenicol+

biphenyl, SDA+ Delvocid+ Chloramphenicol, R2A+ Biphenyl+ Delvocid, WL+

Chloramphenicol+ Biphenyl, WL+ Delvocid+ Chloramphenicol) and the isolates were incubated at 15°C for 4-6 weeks. Ninety-six of microorganisms were isolated from the sediment sample of the “White Rabbit Cave” and a newly discovered cave, “Over The Hill”. Nutrient agar (NA) and potato dextrose agar (PDA) were used for the bioassay plates, and it was incubated at 15°C for 5-7 days until the cave isolates were grown. One positive candidate was found to inhibit the S. aureus (non-pathogenic strain) and the identification of the microorganisms will be done by DNA sequencing in the future study.