Presentation Title

New Homogeneous Catalysts For The Production of Green Diesel

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

The depletion of fossil fuel petroleum reserves has created an urgent need to create new renewable technologies for the production of both fuels and chemicals. Biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Esters) is a clean burning fuel that can be used directly in diesel engines and is derived from triglycerides typically obtained from vegetable oils. However, compared to petroleum diesel, biodiesel is not as efficient in a combustion engine and tends to gel/freeze in colder climates, decreasing the ability for this fuel to be effective during the Canadian winters. All of these disadvantages stem from biodiesel’s high oxygen content. Thus, the direct conversion of triglycerides and fatty acids into a non-oxygenated fuel, green diesel, would be extremely valuable. This research project aims to find new homogeneous deoxygenation catalysts for the direct conversion of triglycerides and fatty acids into green diesel and commodity chemicals such as propane. This directed studies project used a two-fold approach to the problem; the use of already existing and well-known rhodium and iridium catalysts, and the synthesis of new transition metal catalysts.

Department

Chemistry

Faculty Advisor

Dipesh Prema

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New Homogeneous Catalysts For The Production of Green Diesel

The depletion of fossil fuel petroleum reserves has created an urgent need to create new renewable technologies for the production of both fuels and chemicals. Biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Esters) is a clean burning fuel that can be used directly in diesel engines and is derived from triglycerides typically obtained from vegetable oils. However, compared to petroleum diesel, biodiesel is not as efficient in a combustion engine and tends to gel/freeze in colder climates, decreasing the ability for this fuel to be effective during the Canadian winters. All of these disadvantages stem from biodiesel’s high oxygen content. Thus, the direct conversion of triglycerides and fatty acids into a non-oxygenated fuel, green diesel, would be extremely valuable. This research project aims to find new homogeneous deoxygenation catalysts for the direct conversion of triglycerides and fatty acids into green diesel and commodity chemicals such as propane. This directed studies project used a two-fold approach to the problem; the use of already existing and well-known rhodium and iridium catalysts, and the synthesis of new transition metal catalysts.