Presentation Title

Studying the Microbial Community in Mushroom Compost As a Promising Natural Source for Antimicrobial Agents

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

The need to find naturally occurring antifungal agents is imperative, in order to increase our toolbox (repertoire) for the treatment of fungal infections. Historically, wild mushrooms have been a part of the human diet for centuries because of their nutritional, organoleptic and purported medicinal properties. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effects of microorganisms found in mushroom compost against the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. The microorganisms were isolated, purified and screened for anti-Candida activities. Seeded agar technique was adopted where 250 mL of molten Sabouraud dextrose agar were inoculated with Candida albicans cells at a concentration of 106 cells/ mL. One hundred and thirty six pure cultures of bacteria, yeast and fungi were successfully isolated from the mushroom compost using Sabouraud and Wallerstein isolation media, and were incubated at 25℃ for 14 days. 16 bacterial isolates showed anti-Candida activities with diametric zones of inhibition—ranging between 5 and 15mm—with the largest zone of inhibition exhibited by an isolate designated as SCB-A-4-2.01 at 15mm. Positive controls included 0.45% sodium hypochlorite, 0.0625% accelerated Hydrogen Peroxide at 7% w/v and 30µg of Ampicillin impregnated on a paper disk while the negative control was nutrient broth. Furthermore, the molecular identification using the 16S and ITS-5.8S phylogenetic markers of the positive candidates will be performed, followed by the phylogenetic relatedness among the microbial species identified. This study aims to demonstrate that mushroom compost may be a promising natural source for antimicrobial agents.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Naowarat Cheeptham and Soumya Ghosh

Comments

A small flat area to display agar plates.

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Studying the Microbial Community in Mushroom Compost As a Promising Natural Source for Antimicrobial Agents

The need to find naturally occurring antifungal agents is imperative, in order to increase our toolbox (repertoire) for the treatment of fungal infections. Historically, wild mushrooms have been a part of the human diet for centuries because of their nutritional, organoleptic and purported medicinal properties. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effects of microorganisms found in mushroom compost against the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. The microorganisms were isolated, purified and screened for anti-Candida activities. Seeded agar technique was adopted where 250 mL of molten Sabouraud dextrose agar were inoculated with Candida albicans cells at a concentration of 106 cells/ mL. One hundred and thirty six pure cultures of bacteria, yeast and fungi were successfully isolated from the mushroom compost using Sabouraud and Wallerstein isolation media, and were incubated at 25℃ for 14 days. 16 bacterial isolates showed anti-Candida activities with diametric zones of inhibition—ranging between 5 and 15mm—with the largest zone of inhibition exhibited by an isolate designated as SCB-A-4-2.01 at 15mm. Positive controls included 0.45% sodium hypochlorite, 0.0625% accelerated Hydrogen Peroxide at 7% w/v and 30µg of Ampicillin impregnated on a paper disk while the negative control was nutrient broth. Furthermore, the molecular identification using the 16S and ITS-5.8S phylogenetic markers of the positive candidates will be performed, followed by the phylogenetic relatedness among the microbial species identified. This study aims to demonstrate that mushroom compost may be a promising natural source for antimicrobial agents.