Presentation Title

Potential for Glyphosate Resistance in Bohemian Knotweed (Fallopia x bohemica)

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

Japanese knotweed, Fallopia japonica, is an East Asian perennial herb that was transported to North America approximately 100 years ago. The vigorous rhizome structure and astonishingly rapid growth has presented a difficult invasive issue. Being male-sterile, the weed has only reproduced asexually in local locations. This invasive species is causing significant property damage and is a detriment to local biodiversity. Through hybridization with the congeneric Fallopia sachalinensis, the offspring (Fallopia x bohemica) can produce viable seeds for long distance dispersal. The most widely applied herbicide for the control of knotweed is glyphosate. Due to heterosis and long-distance dispersal in this hybrid knotweed, there is potential for the development of herbicide resistance. Our study examined resistance and tolerance attributes in Bohemian knotweed. Seedlings were sprayed with glyphosate in a dose-response test. Initial tests revealed susceptible populations had a slightly more accurate binomial trend-line, whereas the potentially resistant population was faintly irregular to a second-degree polynomial. Further research involved an additional dose-response test by measuring the dry weight of the plants after treatment and statistically comparing them using an analysis of variance (ANOVA). Additionally, a dose-response curve will be compared using a log-logistic analysis. If resistance or even some degree of tolerance is discovered, this study will signify a need for caution in the use of glyphosate. More diverse control methods, utilizing a variety of chemical treatments, mechanical removal, or biological control, must be considered when managing knotweed.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

David Clements

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Potential for Glyphosate Resistance in Bohemian Knotweed (Fallopia x bohemica)

Japanese knotweed, Fallopia japonica, is an East Asian perennial herb that was transported to North America approximately 100 years ago. The vigorous rhizome structure and astonishingly rapid growth has presented a difficult invasive issue. Being male-sterile, the weed has only reproduced asexually in local locations. This invasive species is causing significant property damage and is a detriment to local biodiversity. Through hybridization with the congeneric Fallopia sachalinensis, the offspring (Fallopia x bohemica) can produce viable seeds for long distance dispersal. The most widely applied herbicide for the control of knotweed is glyphosate. Due to heterosis and long-distance dispersal in this hybrid knotweed, there is potential for the development of herbicide resistance. Our study examined resistance and tolerance attributes in Bohemian knotweed. Seedlings were sprayed with glyphosate in a dose-response test. Initial tests revealed susceptible populations had a slightly more accurate binomial trend-line, whereas the potentially resistant population was faintly irregular to a second-degree polynomial. Further research involved an additional dose-response test by measuring the dry weight of the plants after treatment and statistically comparing them using an analysis of variance (ANOVA). Additionally, a dose-response curve will be compared using a log-logistic analysis. If resistance or even some degree of tolerance is discovered, this study will signify a need for caution in the use of glyphosate. More diverse control methods, utilizing a variety of chemical treatments, mechanical removal, or biological control, must be considered when managing knotweed.