Presentation Title

Do Green Tea Catechins and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Hug? An Interaction Study using Capillary Electrophoresis

Presenter Information

Carlee Poleschuk

Location

IB 1015

Start Date

19-3-2016 3:45 PM

End Date

19-3-2016 4:00 PM

Abstract

Cancer, a global disease affecting millions of people, is characterized by uncontrolled cell division due to mutations within the cell. The resulting cell mass continues to rapidly grow, resulting in tumours. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a polyphenolic catechin found in green tea leaves that has been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, it has also been shown to have anti-cancerous effects on various breast cancer cell lines. The effects include inhibiting cancer cell line growth, down regulating estrogen receptor function, inducing apoptosis, inhibiting tumour promotion, and exhibiting antioxidant properties. This shows that EGCG is a potential cancer therapeutic agent. Although these are promising in vitro results, EGCG does not readily cross the cellular phospholipid bilayer in vivo. It is hypothesized that EGCG could be carried through the plasma membrane and into the cell when attached to a lipid molecule. The molecule that is currently being tested as a carrier molecule is the omega-3 fatty acid Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA). The analytical technique Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis has been used to determine if EGCG and DHA will interact under physiological conditions forming a complex that can readily cross the cellular membrane.

Department

Chemistry

Faculty Advisor

Kingsley Donkor

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Mar 19th, 3:45 PM Mar 19th, 4:00 PM

Do Green Tea Catechins and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Hug? An Interaction Study using Capillary Electrophoresis

IB 1015

Cancer, a global disease affecting millions of people, is characterized by uncontrolled cell division due to mutations within the cell. The resulting cell mass continues to rapidly grow, resulting in tumours. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a polyphenolic catechin found in green tea leaves that has been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, it has also been shown to have anti-cancerous effects on various breast cancer cell lines. The effects include inhibiting cancer cell line growth, down regulating estrogen receptor function, inducing apoptosis, inhibiting tumour promotion, and exhibiting antioxidant properties. This shows that EGCG is a potential cancer therapeutic agent. Although these are promising in vitro results, EGCG does not readily cross the cellular phospholipid bilayer in vivo. It is hypothesized that EGCG could be carried through the plasma membrane and into the cell when attached to a lipid molecule. The molecule that is currently being tested as a carrier molecule is the omega-3 fatty acid Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA). The analytical technique Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis has been used to determine if EGCG and DHA will interact under physiological conditions forming a complex that can readily cross the cellular membrane.