Presentation Title

Soulful Knowledge: Using Indigenous Perspective to Construct New Pedagogies for Whole Learning

Presenter Information

Erin-Adel Hrycan

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

19-3-2016 3:30 PM

End Date

19-3-2016 3:45 PM

Abstract

There is a complex interconnectedness between the mind, the body, and the soul when acquiring knowledge-how. Traditionally, we think of knowledge-how as an interplay between a cognitive processing (mind) and, often, a physical (body) processing of interaction with knowing how to do something. In fact, much of traditional education is centered around these two systems alone. Today, we are revolutionizing education where the end goal of education has changed in such a way that it is to, ultimately, enable students to thoughtfully engage in the world around themselves. Now, knowledge-how is considered a symbiotic relationship of the mind, body, and soul and giving opportunity for students to acquire such whole knowledge facilitates positive knowledge mobilization. This way of knowing where our soul and, therefore, emotion plays an integral role is, certainly, not a new concept. In fact, Aboriginal principles consider true knowledge the product of the personal and emotional connection tied to an experience. Currently, the B.C. Curriculum Redesign recognizes that “learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational” (BC Ministry of Education, 2015). The ministry published First People’s worldviews and perspectives as a list of principles for teachers to integrate into pedagogy. This paper delineates the ways in which pedagogy is returning to a holistic method where there is recognized value in students’ ability to connect with sentiment and produce soulful knowledge.

Department

Education

Faculty Advisor

Ginny Ratsoy

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Mar 19th, 3:30 PM Mar 19th, 3:45 PM

Soulful Knowledge: Using Indigenous Perspective to Construct New Pedagogies for Whole Learning

IB 1020

There is a complex interconnectedness between the mind, the body, and the soul when acquiring knowledge-how. Traditionally, we think of knowledge-how as an interplay between a cognitive processing (mind) and, often, a physical (body) processing of interaction with knowing how to do something. In fact, much of traditional education is centered around these two systems alone. Today, we are revolutionizing education where the end goal of education has changed in such a way that it is to, ultimately, enable students to thoughtfully engage in the world around themselves. Now, knowledge-how is considered a symbiotic relationship of the mind, body, and soul and giving opportunity for students to acquire such whole knowledge facilitates positive knowledge mobilization. This way of knowing where our soul and, therefore, emotion plays an integral role is, certainly, not a new concept. In fact, Aboriginal principles consider true knowledge the product of the personal and emotional connection tied to an experience. Currently, the B.C. Curriculum Redesign recognizes that “learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational” (BC Ministry of Education, 2015). The ministry published First People’s worldviews and perspectives as a list of principles for teachers to integrate into pedagogy. This paper delineates the ways in which pedagogy is returning to a holistic method where there is recognized value in students’ ability to connect with sentiment and produce soulful knowledge.