Presentation Title

Introduction of Taijin Kyofusho and the Underlying Japanese Cultural Specific Social Contributors

Presenter Information

Tsz Yin Fung

Location

IB 1010

Start Date

19-3-2016 3:45 PM

End Date

19-3-2016 4:00 PM

Abstract

The reason why the psychology disorder, Taijin Kyofusho, is rarely found in other countries except Japan, is poorly understood. This study intends to investigate how Japanese customs and traditions might potentially give rise to Taijin Kyofusho. In this study, several potential contributors are identified. Firstly, a Japanese-specific cognitive construct, called "amae", is thought to contribute to the development of Taijin Kyofusho. It is hypothesized that amae, which underlines a sense of unconditional nurturance, without any obligation to reciprocate, potentially burdens some people with stress and leads to pathological fear of interpersonal relationships. Another potential contributor are the specific display rules, which are assumptions people hold as they decide whether some emotions are appropriate or not. Researchers found that the Japanese hold a stricter display rule than Americans, entailing that Japanese people are less likely to freely display their emotions. This study also discovered that Japanese people often felt obligated to say yes to a equest even if it presented an impossible burden at the time. Lastly, the social pressure to retain harmony in the society is considered a contributing factor to the development of Taijin Kyofusho. The aim of the oral presentation is to display and illustrate these aforementioned findings and raise awareness of the existence of Taijin Kyofusho, as it is rarely known in Western culture.

Department

English and Modern Languages

Faculty Advisor

Jan Duerden

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Mar 19th, 3:45 PM Mar 19th, 4:00 PM

Introduction of Taijin Kyofusho and the Underlying Japanese Cultural Specific Social Contributors

IB 1010

The reason why the psychology disorder, Taijin Kyofusho, is rarely found in other countries except Japan, is poorly understood. This study intends to investigate how Japanese customs and traditions might potentially give rise to Taijin Kyofusho. In this study, several potential contributors are identified. Firstly, a Japanese-specific cognitive construct, called "amae", is thought to contribute to the development of Taijin Kyofusho. It is hypothesized that amae, which underlines a sense of unconditional nurturance, without any obligation to reciprocate, potentially burdens some people with stress and leads to pathological fear of interpersonal relationships. Another potential contributor are the specific display rules, which are assumptions people hold as they decide whether some emotions are appropriate or not. Researchers found that the Japanese hold a stricter display rule than Americans, entailing that Japanese people are less likely to freely display their emotions. This study also discovered that Japanese people often felt obligated to say yes to a equest even if it presented an impossible burden at the time. Lastly, the social pressure to retain harmony in the society is considered a contributing factor to the development of Taijin Kyofusho. The aim of the oral presentation is to display and illustrate these aforementioned findings and raise awareness of the existence of Taijin Kyofusho, as it is rarely known in Western culture.