Presentation Title

Planting Seeds of Sustainability

Presenter Information

Jennifer Lam

Location

IB 1015

Start Date

19-3-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

19-3-2016 2:45 PM

Abstract

Planting seeds of sustainability is an exploration across all avenues of natural resource practices through the lens of ecofeminism. The first section centralizes around the physiology of (crop) seeds and how chemical treatment on and within seeds will alter the course of their life history. Systematic pesticides, mainly neonicotinoids, are observed in their pathways through the seed and the seed environment (soil, water, and air) but also through the systems of the insects they infect. This in turn sets the foundation for how seeds are currently being utilized, treated, and thought of globally. The second section launches into planting metaphysical seeds of sustainability introducing the ecofeminist perspective as a tool to thoroughly evaluate the values and principles that currently underpin our natural resource endeavors. Key concepts explored include the western mentality of fertility, the exploitation those capable of fertility, and how gender archetypes play into how we justify current industrial practices. The final section pulls together the tangible facets and abstract concepts of seeds to determine their effects on the emerging generation. Do all these predispositions stunt and inhibit those of the next generation, or is there still room for paradigm shifting circles of thought?

Department

Natural Resource Science

Faculty Advisor

Lyn Baldwin

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 19th, 2:30 PM Mar 19th, 2:45 PM

Planting Seeds of Sustainability

IB 1015

Planting seeds of sustainability is an exploration across all avenues of natural resource practices through the lens of ecofeminism. The first section centralizes around the physiology of (crop) seeds and how chemical treatment on and within seeds will alter the course of their life history. Systematic pesticides, mainly neonicotinoids, are observed in their pathways through the seed and the seed environment (soil, water, and air) but also through the systems of the insects they infect. This in turn sets the foundation for how seeds are currently being utilized, treated, and thought of globally. The second section launches into planting metaphysical seeds of sustainability introducing the ecofeminist perspective as a tool to thoroughly evaluate the values and principles that currently underpin our natural resource endeavors. Key concepts explored include the western mentality of fertility, the exploitation those capable of fertility, and how gender archetypes play into how we justify current industrial practices. The final section pulls together the tangible facets and abstract concepts of seeds to determine their effects on the emerging generation. Do all these predispositions stunt and inhibit those of the next generation, or is there still room for paradigm shifting circles of thought?