Presentation Title

A Lifetime of Contributions: A Review of the Work of Chauncy D. Harris in the Field of Urban Geography

Presenter Information

Alexis Karakatsoulis

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

19-3-2016 2:15 PM

End Date

19-3-2016 2:30 PM

Abstract

Chauncy Harris’ 1945 paper with Edward Ulllman titled “The nature of cities” is a seminal contribution that influenced generations of urban geographers. In it the authors present the multiple nuclei model of city growth, a model meant to illustrate the processes leading to changes in the form and structure of post-Second World War cities of the United States in the 1940’s. Up until his passing in 2003 Harris had been an active member in the field of urban geography and the geography discipline as a whole. He studied and worked at the University of Chicago’s department of Geography where he was a major contributor for over thirty years. Harris’ work spans from a quest for understanding urbanization and urban forms in the United States to his insights into Soviet Union urban planning and the design of cityscapes. This presentation will explore Harris’ work and contribution to urban geography from the early 1940’s until his passing in the early 2000’s.

Faculty Advisor

Gilles Viaud

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Mar 19th, 2:15 PM Mar 19th, 2:30 PM

A Lifetime of Contributions: A Review of the Work of Chauncy D. Harris in the Field of Urban Geography

IB 1020

Chauncy Harris’ 1945 paper with Edward Ulllman titled “The nature of cities” is a seminal contribution that influenced generations of urban geographers. In it the authors present the multiple nuclei model of city growth, a model meant to illustrate the processes leading to changes in the form and structure of post-Second World War cities of the United States in the 1940’s. Up until his passing in 2003 Harris had been an active member in the field of urban geography and the geography discipline as a whole. He studied and worked at the University of Chicago’s department of Geography where he was a major contributor for over thirty years. Harris’ work spans from a quest for understanding urbanization and urban forms in the United States to his insights into Soviet Union urban planning and the design of cityscapes. This presentation will explore Harris’ work and contribution to urban geography from the early 1940’s until his passing in the early 2000’s.