Presentation Title

The Effects of Music on Short-Term Memory

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

This study looks at the effects of music on short-term memory, allowing us to find the best type of music to listen to while studying. We hypothesize that listening to rock music will interfere with short-term recall of a list of words more than listening to pop music. We also hypothesize that music without lyrics will produce less interference with short-term memory storage, and thus not interfere with short-term memory as much as music with lyrics. This is due to the belief that pop music tends to have a lower tempo than rock music. As for the music without lyrics, it will create less interference than music with lyrics and therefore will allow for participants to remember more from the word list. In order to test this hypothesis, four randomly selected groups will be tested on their ability to remember words from a word list while listening to either a top 40 pop or a rock cover of Carly-Rae Jepson’s “Call Me Maybe”. Group one will be listening to the top 40 pop version of the song with lyrics, group two will be listening to the top 40 pop version of the song without lyrics, group three will be listening to the rock version of the song with lyrics, and group four will be listening to the rock version of the song without lyrics. We expect to find that the group listening to the top 40 pop version of the song without lyrics will have the highest recall, while the rock version of the song with lyrics will have the lowest recall.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Jenni Karl

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Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

The Effects of Music on Short-Term Memory

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

This study looks at the effects of music on short-term memory, allowing us to find the best type of music to listen to while studying. We hypothesize that listening to rock music will interfere with short-term recall of a list of words more than listening to pop music. We also hypothesize that music without lyrics will produce less interference with short-term memory storage, and thus not interfere with short-term memory as much as music with lyrics. This is due to the belief that pop music tends to have a lower tempo than rock music. As for the music without lyrics, it will create less interference than music with lyrics and therefore will allow for participants to remember more from the word list. In order to test this hypothesis, four randomly selected groups will be tested on their ability to remember words from a word list while listening to either a top 40 pop or a rock cover of Carly-Rae Jepson’s “Call Me Maybe”. Group one will be listening to the top 40 pop version of the song with lyrics, group two will be listening to the top 40 pop version of the song without lyrics, group three will be listening to the rock version of the song with lyrics, and group four will be listening to the rock version of the song without lyrics. We expect to find that the group listening to the top 40 pop version of the song without lyrics will have the highest recall, while the rock version of the song with lyrics will have the lowest recall.