Presentation Title

The Fundamentals of CT Scanning

Presenter Information

Zachary Parsons

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

This project involves the study of the fundamentals of computerized tomography (CT) scans. A CT scan is traditionally formed from a series of x-ray images combined into a tomographic (cross-sectional) picture. These images are combined through the use of a computer process, hence the 'computerized' in CT. The final picture allows the inside of an object, usually a human being, to be examined without invasion. While typically this is done with x-rays, the principles of CT scans may be studied with simpler methods. One such method – and the method used in this study - is through the use of a laser and a light detector. The object(s) studied were set up at various positions and angles to take many intensity readings, which through the use of a computer ‘backprojection’ algorithm resulted in 'images' of the object(s) between the source and detector. In time this project could potentially be set up as an advanced laboratory experiment for senior physics students, introducing them to the area of medical physics and medical imaging.

Department

Physics

Faculty Advisor

Mark Paetkau

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Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

The Fundamentals of CT Scanning

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

This project involves the study of the fundamentals of computerized tomography (CT) scans. A CT scan is traditionally formed from a series of x-ray images combined into a tomographic (cross-sectional) picture. These images are combined through the use of a computer process, hence the 'computerized' in CT. The final picture allows the inside of an object, usually a human being, to be examined without invasion. While typically this is done with x-rays, the principles of CT scans may be studied with simpler methods. One such method – and the method used in this study - is through the use of a laser and a light detector. The object(s) studied were set up at various positions and angles to take many intensity readings, which through the use of a computer ‘backprojection’ algorithm resulted in 'images' of the object(s) between the source and detector. In time this project could potentially be set up as an advanced laboratory experiment for senior physics students, introducing them to the area of medical physics and medical imaging.