Presentation Title

Assessing Control Methods for Yellow Flag Iris (Iris pseudacorus) and their Impact on Aquatic Invertebrates

Presenter Information

Kailee Streichert

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

Yellow flag iris (Iris pseudacorus) is one of many invasive macrophyte species in British Columbia, specifically around riparian shores, which is altering ecosystem processes. The purpose of the research is to develop a control method for yellow flag iris and to understand what affect this species is having on the aquatic macro-invertebrate community. A field trial was conducted at 6 locations across southern British Columbia, Canada. At each location, multiple sites were selected to test the efficacy of a benthic barrier (rubber matting) on controlling yellow flag iris, versus removing the vegetation only and a control (no treatment). Cellular health of the rhizomes under treatment was monitored over the course of 150 days. Invertebrate samples were acquired at the time of implementation of the iris treatments using a d-frame kick net in both the yellow flag iris infested and native macrophyte patches. Results are currently being analyzed. Through this research, we will understand the affect this iris species is having on the macro-invertebrate community and the potential bottom-up impacts. A low-cost, effective control method for yellow flag iris can be implemented in a rapid response program from this research

Department

Natural Resource Science

Faculty Advisor

Brian Heise

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Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

Assessing Control Methods for Yellow Flag Iris (Iris pseudacorus) and their Impact on Aquatic Invertebrates

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Yellow flag iris (Iris pseudacorus) is one of many invasive macrophyte species in British Columbia, specifically around riparian shores, which is altering ecosystem processes. The purpose of the research is to develop a control method for yellow flag iris and to understand what affect this species is having on the aquatic macro-invertebrate community. A field trial was conducted at 6 locations across southern British Columbia, Canada. At each location, multiple sites were selected to test the efficacy of a benthic barrier (rubber matting) on controlling yellow flag iris, versus removing the vegetation only and a control (no treatment). Cellular health of the rhizomes under treatment was monitored over the course of 150 days. Invertebrate samples were acquired at the time of implementation of the iris treatments using a d-frame kick net in both the yellow flag iris infested and native macrophyte patches. Results are currently being analyzed. Through this research, we will understand the affect this iris species is having on the macro-invertebrate community and the potential bottom-up impacts. A low-cost, effective control method for yellow flag iris can be implemented in a rapid response program from this research