Presentation Title

Do Mountain Chickadees (Poecile gambeli) Alter their Vocalizations to Reduce Aggression from Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus)?

Presenter Information

Cara Snell

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

Various species interact with one another on a daily basis, and when habitats overlap and species compete for resources, negative interactions often arise. In closely related species, such as European great tits and blue tits, dominant great tits are highly aggressive to the subdominant blue tit. In response, blue tits shift their song structure in regions of geographic overlap to minimize negative interactions. Previous research shows that mountain chickadees, similar to tits, change their song structure in regions of geographic overlap with the dominant black-capped chickadee. One theory as to why the mountain chickadee has changed its song is to decrease aggression from the black-capped chickadees. To test this, I conducted a playback study with black-capped chickadees in Prince George, BC, using songs from mountain chickadees from overlapping and non-overlapping regions. Data was extracted using acoustic programs for audio analysis and analyzed through the use of mixed models. Results determined that black-capped chickadees do not differentiate between the mountain chickadee songs and have equal intensity reactions to songs from both overlapping and non-overlapping regions. These results help to understand the interactions between species with increasing infringement of territories and shared habitats due to climate change or fragmentation of native habitat.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Matt Reudink

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Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

Do Mountain Chickadees (Poecile gambeli) Alter their Vocalizations to Reduce Aggression from Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus)?

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Various species interact with one another on a daily basis, and when habitats overlap and species compete for resources, negative interactions often arise. In closely related species, such as European great tits and blue tits, dominant great tits are highly aggressive to the subdominant blue tit. In response, blue tits shift their song structure in regions of geographic overlap to minimize negative interactions. Previous research shows that mountain chickadees, similar to tits, change their song structure in regions of geographic overlap with the dominant black-capped chickadee. One theory as to why the mountain chickadee has changed its song is to decrease aggression from the black-capped chickadees. To test this, I conducted a playback study with black-capped chickadees in Prince George, BC, using songs from mountain chickadees from overlapping and non-overlapping regions. Data was extracted using acoustic programs for audio analysis and analyzed through the use of mixed models. Results determined that black-capped chickadees do not differentiate between the mountain chickadee songs and have equal intensity reactions to songs from both overlapping and non-overlapping regions. These results help to understand the interactions between species with increasing infringement of territories and shared habitats due to climate change or fragmentation of native habitat.