Presentation Title

The Effects of Eye Closure and Preparedness on Memory Recall Performance

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

Previous studies show that eye closure improves memory recall performance. Establishing conditions of the strongest effect may reshape current beliefs about learning and academic performance. This study explores the effects of two independent variables (a short period of eye closure, and prior awareness of memory testing) on the dependent variable of memory recall performance. For this 2x2 between-subjects factorial design we will provide all participants with an information package prior to watching a comical, continuous compilation of “5-second-video” clips totalling 2:26 minutes. Instructions in this package will inform half the participants that they will be tested on their ability to recall details from the video, while the other half of the participants will not. All participants will watch the video, then half of the participants with prior awareness and half without will be further instructed to either close their eyes or stare at a blank page until verbally cued (60 sec) to open their eyes/look away from the blank page. All participants will have 4 minutes to answer 18 uniform, short, written questions with short answers only, plus 1 minute to answer 5 validity questions screening for confounds. We hypothesize that eye-closure will surpass any eyes-opened condition and that the eyes-opened with no prior awareness condition will produce the poorest results for memory recall. Results will inform on optimal academic learning and testing conditions in a wide field.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Jenni Karl

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Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

The Effects of Eye Closure and Preparedness on Memory Recall Performance

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Previous studies show that eye closure improves memory recall performance. Establishing conditions of the strongest effect may reshape current beliefs about learning and academic performance. This study explores the effects of two independent variables (a short period of eye closure, and prior awareness of memory testing) on the dependent variable of memory recall performance. For this 2x2 between-subjects factorial design we will provide all participants with an information package prior to watching a comical, continuous compilation of “5-second-video” clips totalling 2:26 minutes. Instructions in this package will inform half the participants that they will be tested on their ability to recall details from the video, while the other half of the participants will not. All participants will watch the video, then half of the participants with prior awareness and half without will be further instructed to either close their eyes or stare at a blank page until verbally cued (60 sec) to open their eyes/look away from the blank page. All participants will have 4 minutes to answer 18 uniform, short, written questions with short answers only, plus 1 minute to answer 5 validity questions screening for confounds. We hypothesize that eye-closure will surpass any eyes-opened condition and that the eyes-opened with no prior awareness condition will produce the poorest results for memory recall. Results will inform on optimal academic learning and testing conditions in a wide field.