Presentation Title

Targeted Manipulation of the Gut Microbiome for Use in Targeted Medicine

Presenter Information

Siobhann Richmond-Justice

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

Within the human body, microbial cells far outweigh the human cells. There is approximately ten times more genetic information from these microbes than are contained in the human cells. While the full extent to which these microbes affect human health is still being discovered, links between changes in the human gut microbiome have been linked to allergies, obesity, inflammatory conditions and other medical conditions in both adults and children. As we become more familiar with the species contained within the human gut, the link between various species and certain medical conditions will become more clear. In order to correct these imbalances, targeted manipulations of the microbiome can be done theoretically through a number of procedures. Once the harmful species of bacteria are removed, genetically modified bacteria, such as those that produce secondary metabolites useful for treatment of various conditions could be implanted into the microbiome.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Don Nelson

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Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

Targeted Manipulation of the Gut Microbiome for Use in Targeted Medicine

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Within the human body, microbial cells far outweigh the human cells. There is approximately ten times more genetic information from these microbes than are contained in the human cells. While the full extent to which these microbes affect human health is still being discovered, links between changes in the human gut microbiome have been linked to allergies, obesity, inflammatory conditions and other medical conditions in both adults and children. As we become more familiar with the species contained within the human gut, the link between various species and certain medical conditions will become more clear. In order to correct these imbalances, targeted manipulations of the microbiome can be done theoretically through a number of procedures. Once the harmful species of bacteria are removed, genetically modified bacteria, such as those that produce secondary metabolites useful for treatment of various conditions could be implanted into the microbiome.