Presentation Title

Perceived Social Support, Social Interest and Mental Health: Testing a Mediator Model

Presenter Information

Tsz Yin Fung

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between social interest, perceived levels of social support and mental health. Social interest is described as caring about human welfare, public-spiritedness, and valuing of others than the self. Perceived social support is the perception of being supported and understood by friends and family.
Past research has indicated a relationship between perceived levels of social support and mental health. Particularly, people with high levels of perceived social support are associated with significantly lower levels of depression and anxiety, and better quality of life and psychological adjustment, compared to people with low levels of perceived social support. However, some researchers in the area suggest that the relationship between perceived social support and mental health is mediated by other variables. I believe the link between perceived social support and mental health is not yet fully understood and more studies in this regard are needed. In the present study, I utilize a mediation model to examine the negative correlational relationship between perceived social support and mental health, using social interest as the mediator. Study results could extend our knowledge about the effect of perceived social support on mental health.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Reid Webster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

Perceived Social Support, Social Interest and Mental Health: Testing a Mediator Model

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

This study examines the relationship between social interest, perceived levels of social support and mental health. Social interest is described as caring about human welfare, public-spiritedness, and valuing of others than the self. Perceived social support is the perception of being supported and understood by friends and family.
Past research has indicated a relationship between perceived levels of social support and mental health. Particularly, people with high levels of perceived social support are associated with significantly lower levels of depression and anxiety, and better quality of life and psychological adjustment, compared to people with low levels of perceived social support. However, some researchers in the area suggest that the relationship between perceived social support and mental health is mediated by other variables. I believe the link between perceived social support and mental health is not yet fully understood and more studies in this regard are needed. In the present study, I utilize a mediation model to examine the negative correlational relationship between perceived social support and mental health, using social interest as the mediator. Study results could extend our knowledge about the effect of perceived social support on mental health.