Presentation Title

The Unexposed Secret: Understanding Factors Of Sexual Abuse that Influence Breastfeeding Practices

Presenter Information

Alysha Piva

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

Breastfeeding is a controversial topic in today’s society and for sexual abuse survivors breastfeeding may not be possible due to a variety of underlying factors. This research goes beyond the common notions of why a women should breastfeed, understanding the implications of childhood sexual abuse and the protective factors associated with breastfeeding. Throughout daily interactions with sexual abuse survivors in practice and examining multiple case studies, five key themes emerged that influenced why childhood sexual abuse had caused women to stop breastfeeding: physical, behavioral, spiritual, interpersonal, and cognitive. In order to conduct my evaluation, a concept map was developed, examining the five factors above. It is important that as a society we not only start talking about these hidden reasons behind why women are not breastfeeding, but also how breastfeeding can assist women in maintaining their holistic health. My conclusions advocate the significance of informing health-care professionals, sexual abuse survivors, and the general public about sexual abuse and its impact on breastfeeding, thereby reducing assumptions and judgements, and allowing mothers to make decisions around breastfeeding that they feel are best for themselves and their infant.

Department

Human Service Diploma & English and Modern Languages

Faculty Advisor

Tanya Pawliuk and Jan Duerden

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Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

The Unexposed Secret: Understanding Factors Of Sexual Abuse that Influence Breastfeeding Practices

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Breastfeeding is a controversial topic in today’s society and for sexual abuse survivors breastfeeding may not be possible due to a variety of underlying factors. This research goes beyond the common notions of why a women should breastfeed, understanding the implications of childhood sexual abuse and the protective factors associated with breastfeeding. Throughout daily interactions with sexual abuse survivors in practice and examining multiple case studies, five key themes emerged that influenced why childhood sexual abuse had caused women to stop breastfeeding: physical, behavioral, spiritual, interpersonal, and cognitive. In order to conduct my evaluation, a concept map was developed, examining the five factors above. It is important that as a society we not only start talking about these hidden reasons behind why women are not breastfeeding, but also how breastfeeding can assist women in maintaining their holistic health. My conclusions advocate the significance of informing health-care professionals, sexual abuse survivors, and the general public about sexual abuse and its impact on breastfeeding, thereby reducing assumptions and judgements, and allowing mothers to make decisions around breastfeeding that they feel are best for themselves and their infant.