Presentation Title

Labyrinthine Tasks: The Effects of Mental Tasks on Recollection

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

We are constantly bombarded with mental challenges that can affect memory. We are interested in determining whether completing a difficult mental task will impair recall ability, and whether the effect will be exacerbated if the words to be recalled are initially presented in a non-logical (randomized) order. We will test this hypothesis by randomly assigning participants (third year Psychology students) an identical list of 24 words, either in alphabetical or in random order. The participants will then complete either the possible maze or the impossible maze, after which they will be asked to record as many words as they can possibly remember from the original word list. The participants will be divided into four groups in a 2x2 between-subjects design. We will quantify word recall ability by counting the number of words each participant correctly recalls from the initial list. We expect to find that participants that faced the more difficult mental task (the impossible maze) will have lower word recall. We also anticipate that participants with the randomized list will have lower recall than those with the alphabetical list. The results of this study will allow us to determine whether or not mental tasks influence performance in everyday life, which could open avenues of research regarding daily mental tasks that may interfere with memory performance.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Jenni Karl

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

Labyrinthine Tasks: The Effects of Mental Tasks on Recollection

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

We are constantly bombarded with mental challenges that can affect memory. We are interested in determining whether completing a difficult mental task will impair recall ability, and whether the effect will be exacerbated if the words to be recalled are initially presented in a non-logical (randomized) order. We will test this hypothesis by randomly assigning participants (third year Psychology students) an identical list of 24 words, either in alphabetical or in random order. The participants will then complete either the possible maze or the impossible maze, after which they will be asked to record as many words as they can possibly remember from the original word list. The participants will be divided into four groups in a 2x2 between-subjects design. We will quantify word recall ability by counting the number of words each participant correctly recalls from the initial list. We expect to find that participants that faced the more difficult mental task (the impossible maze) will have lower word recall. We also anticipate that participants with the randomized list will have lower recall than those with the alphabetical list. The results of this study will allow us to determine whether or not mental tasks influence performance in everyday life, which could open avenues of research regarding daily mental tasks that may interfere with memory performance.