Presentation Title

Parts of Speech and the Effect on Short Term False Recall

Location

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

Start Date

18-3-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

18-3-2016 6:00 PM

Abstract

As students, the ability to accurately recall previously read text is crucial to our success. Previous research suggests that verbs are easier to remember than nouns and that exciting words are easier to remember than calm words. Thus, we hypothesized that these same factors might influence the rate at which individuals would falsely recall a word that they had actually not previously read. To test this idea we have designed a 2x2 between subjects experiment to determine the incidence of false recall among students trying to remember a list of previously read words. Third year psychology students were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Each group was asked to study a word list containing entirely: 1) excitatory nouns, 2) excitatory verbs, 3) calming nouns, or 4) calming verbs. After 30 seconds students were asked to select, from a second list, any words that they recalled from the first list. The second list contained some words from the first list and filler words that were not presented before, but fit each group. False recall was measured by counting the number of falsely remembered words on the second list. We expect more false recall for nouns, especially calming nouns, as previous research suggests that these types of words are the most difficult to remember. The results of this research could change how we students use our memory and increase our success in our studies.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Jenni Karl

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Mar 18th, 12:00 PM Mar 18th, 6:00 PM

Parts of Speech and the Effect on Short Term False Recall

House of Learning Library, 3rd floor

As students, the ability to accurately recall previously read text is crucial to our success. Previous research suggests that verbs are easier to remember than nouns and that exciting words are easier to remember than calm words. Thus, we hypothesized that these same factors might influence the rate at which individuals would falsely recall a word that they had actually not previously read. To test this idea we have designed a 2x2 between subjects experiment to determine the incidence of false recall among students trying to remember a list of previously read words. Third year psychology students were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Each group was asked to study a word list containing entirely: 1) excitatory nouns, 2) excitatory verbs, 3) calming nouns, or 4) calming verbs. After 30 seconds students were asked to select, from a second list, any words that they recalled from the first list. The second list contained some words from the first list and filler words that were not presented before, but fit each group. False recall was measured by counting the number of falsely remembered words on the second list. We expect more false recall for nouns, especially calming nouns, as previous research suggests that these types of words are the most difficult to remember. The results of this research could change how we students use our memory and increase our success in our studies.